The world's first wiki where authorship really matters (Nature Genetics, 2008). Due credit and reputation for authors. Imagine a global collaborative knowledge base for original thoughts. Search thousands of articles and collaborate with scientists around the globe.

wikigene or wiki gene protein drug chemical gene disease author authorship tracking collaborative publishing evolutionary knowledge reputation system wiki2.0 global collaboration genes proteins drugs chemicals diseases compound
Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 

Links

 

Gene Review

Nek1  -  NIMA (never in mitosis gene a)-related...

Mus musculus

Synonyms: D8Ertd790e, Never in mitosis A-related kinase 1, NimA-related protein kinase 1, Serine/threonine-protein kinase Nek1, kat, ...
 
 
Welcome! If you are familiar with the subject of this article, you can contribute to this open access knowledge base by deleting incorrect information, restructuring or completely rewriting any text. Read more.
 

Disease relevance of Nek1

  • Mutations in a NIMA-related kinase gene, Nek1, cause pleiotropic effects including a progressive polycystic kidney disease in mice [1].
  • Mice with mutations in Nek1 or Nek8 have cystic kidneys; therefore, our discovery that a member of this phylogenetic group of Nek proteins is localized to the same sites in Chlamydomonas and kidney epithelial cells suggests that Neks play conserved roles in the coordination of cilia and cell cycle progression [2].
  • Virus produced using the kat system was shown to be free of detectable replication competent retrovirus by an extended provirus mobilization assay, demonstrating that this system is as safe as currently available stable packaging lines [3].
 

High impact information on Nek1

  • Despite its identification with anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies, Nek1 contains sequence motifs characteristic of protein serine/threonine kinases [4].
  • These results suggest that Nek1 is a mammalian relative of the fungal NIMA cell cycle regulator [4].
  • A mammalian dual specificity protein kinase, Nek1, is related to the NIMA cell cycle regulator and highly expressed in meiotic germ cells [4].
  • Nek1 contains an N-terminal protein kinase domain which is most similar (42% identity) to the catalytic domain of NIMA, a protein kinase which controls initiation of mitosis in Aspergillus nidulans [4].
  • The Nek1 kinase domain, when expressed in bacteria, phosphorylated exogenous substrates primarily on serine/threonine, but also on tyrosine, indicating that Nek1 is a dual specificity kinase with the capacity to phosphorylate all three hydroxyamino acids [4].
 

Biological context of Nek1

  • These results suggest that Nek1 may function as a kinase early in the DNA damage response pathway [5].
  • A Trypanosoma brucei gene family encoding protein kinases with catalytic domains structurally related to Nek1 and NIMA [6].
  • We previously have described a mouse model for polycystic kidney disease (PKD) caused by either of two mutations, kat or kat(2J), that map to the same locus on chromosome 8 [1].
  • The mutations, designated kat and kat2J, affect a chromosomal segment homologous to a region of human chromosome 4q35; the altered gene has not yet been identified [7].
 

Anatomical context of Nek1

  • Finally, Nek1-deficient fibroblasts are much more sensitive to the effects of IR-induced DNA damage than otherwise identical fibroblasts expressing Nek1 [5].
  • Similarly to Nek1, mSTK2 is expressed ubiquitously among various organs and is upregulated in the testis [8].
  • kat: a high-efficiency retroviral transduction system for primary human T lymphocytes [3].
 

Associations of Nek1 with chemical compounds

  • Screening of mouse cDNA expression libraries with antibodies to phosphotyrosine resulted in repeated isolation of cDNAs that encode a novel mammalian protein kinase of 774 amino acids, termed Nek1 [4].
  • The 279-aa N-terminal catalytic domain has highest homology with Nek1, a bifunctional kinase, and NIMA, a protein serine/threonine kinase [6].
 

Other interactions of Nek1

  • In contrast to Nek1 and Nek2, Nek3 levels were not particularly elevated in either the male or the female germ line [9].

References

  1. Mutations in a NIMA-related kinase gene, Nek1, cause pleiotropic effects including a progressive polycystic kidney disease in mice. Upadhya, P., Birkenmeier, E.H., Birkenmeier, C.S., Barker, J.E. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. (2000) [Pubmed]
  2. A NIMA-related kinase, Fa2p, localizes to a novel site in the proximal cilia of Chlamydomonas and mouse kidney cells. Mahjoub, M.R., Qasim Rasi, M., Quarmby, L.M. Mol. Biol. Cell (2004) [Pubmed]
  3. kat: a high-efficiency retroviral transduction system for primary human T lymphocytes. Finer, M.H., Dull, T.J., Qin, L., Farson, D., Roberts, M.R. Blood (1994) [Pubmed]
  4. A mammalian dual specificity protein kinase, Nek1, is related to the NIMA cell cycle regulator and highly expressed in meiotic germ cells. Letwin, K., Mizzen, L., Motro, B., Ben-David, Y., Bernstein, A., Pawson, T. EMBO J. (1992) [Pubmed]
  5. NIMA-related protein kinase 1 is involved early in the ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage response. Polci, R., Peng, A., Chen, P.L., Riley, D.J., Chen, Y. Cancer Res. (2004) [Pubmed]
  6. A Trypanosoma brucei gene family encoding protein kinases with catalytic domains structurally related to Nek1 and NIMA. Gale, M., Parsons, M. Mol. Biochem. Parasitol. (1993) [Pubmed]
  7. Clinical and pathologic findings in two new allelic murine models of polycystic kidney disease. Vogler, C., Homan, S., Pung, A., Thorpe, C., Barker, J., Birkenmeier, E.H., Upadhya, P. J. Am. Soc. Nephrol. (1999) [Pubmed]
  8. Activity and substrate specificity of the murine STK2 Serine/Threonine kinase that is structurally related to the mitotic regulator protein NIMA of Aspergillus nidulans. Hayashi, K., Igarashi, H., Ogawa, M., Sakaguchi, N. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. (1999) [Pubmed]
  9. Cloning and characterization of the murine Nek3 protein kinase, a novel member of the NIMA family of putative cell cycle regulators. Tanaka, K., Nigg, E.A. J. Biol. Chem. (1999) [Pubmed]
 
WikiGenes - Universities