The world's first wiki where authorship really matters (Nature Genetics, 2008). Due credit and reputation for authors. Imagine a global collaborative knowledge base for original thoughts. Search thousands of articles and collaborate with scientists around the globe.

wikigene or wiki gene protein drug chemical gene disease author authorship tracking collaborative publishing evolutionary knowledge reputation system wiki2.0 global collaboration genes proteins drugs chemicals diseases compound
Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

Synthesis of the equine estrogen metabolites 2-hydroxyequilin and 2-hydroxyequilenin.

Equilin and equilenin make up approximately 20% of Premarin which is currently the most popular estrogen replacement therapy. Although there are numerous health benefits of estrogen replacement therapy, there are concerns over the link between estrogen replacement therapy and breast and endometrial cancer risk. One potential mechanism of estrogen carcinogenesis involves metabolism of estrogens to 2- and 4-hydroxylated catechols which are further oxidized to electrophilic/redox active o-quinones which have the potential to both initiate and promote the carcinogenic process. In this investigation, we have synthesized potential metabolites of equilin and equilenin, 2-hydroxyequilin and 2-hydroxyequilenin, respectively, as well as their methyl ether metabolites. These compounds were synthesized from commercially available optically pure equilin via a practical and efficient approach; five steps gave 2-methoxyequilin from which 2-hydroxyequilin was prepared by BBr3-catalyzed demethylation in one step. Similarly, treating 2-methoxyequilin with SeO2 followed by demethylation with BBr3 produced 2-hydroxyequilenin. The structures of the catechols as well as those of their methoxy ethers were unambiguously characterized by one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR experiments, including 1H, 13C, APT, COSY, HMBC, and HMQC as well as mass spectrometry.[1]

References

 
WikiGenes - Universities