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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

The morphine-binding site on human activated T-cells is not related to the mu opioid receptor.

Mitogen activation of human T-lymphocytes induces a morphine-binding site. Morphine binding is displaceable by beta-endorphin (1--31) and (--)-naloxone but not DAMGO. This site is not stereoselective for (--)-morphine. T-lymphocytes, expressing this binding site, were assayed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for expression of hMOR-1 mRNA. Several primer sets were used and each assay compared with cells known to express human or mouse MOR-1 mRNA. Neither hMOR-1 nor any homologous receptor was detected in human T-lymphocytes. Therefore, the morphine-binding site on mitogen-activated T-lymphocytes is unlikely to be closely related to hMOR-1.[1]

References

  1. The morphine-binding site on human activated T-cells is not related to the mu opioid receptor. Madden, J.J., Whaley, W.L., Ketelsen, D., Donahoe, R.M. Drug and alcohol dependence. (2001) [Pubmed]
 
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