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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

Relationship between cyanogenic compounds in kernels, leaves, and roots of sweet and bitter kernelled almonds.

The relationship between the levels of cyanogenic compounds (amygdalin and prunasin) in kernels, leaves, and roots of 5 sweet-, 5 slightly bitter-, and 5 bitter-kernelled almond trees was determined. Variability was observed among the genotypes for these compounds. Prunasin was found only in the vegetative part (roots and leaves) for all genotypes tested. Amygdalin was detected only in the kernels, mainly in bitter genotypes. In general, bitter-kernelled genotypes had higher levels of prunasin in their roots than nonbitter ones, but the correlation between cyanogenic compounds in the different parts of plants was not high. While prunasin seems to be present in most almond roots (with a variable concentration) only bitter-kernelled genotypes are able to transform it into amygdalin in the kernel. Breeding for prunasin-based resistance to the buprestid beetle Capnodis tenebrionis L. is discussed.[1]

References

  1. Relationship between cyanogenic compounds in kernels, leaves, and roots of sweet and bitter kernelled almonds. Dicenta, F., Martínez-Gómez, P., Grané, N., Martín, M.L., León, A., Cánovas, J.A., Berenguer, V. J. Agric. Food Chem. (2002) [Pubmed]
 
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