The world's first wiki where authorship really matters (Nature Genetics, 2008). Due credit and reputation for authors. Imagine a global collaborative knowledge base for original thoughts. Search thousands of articles and collaborate with scientists around the globe.

wikigene or wiki gene protein drug chemical gene disease author authorship tracking collaborative publishing evolutionary knowledge reputation system wiki2.0 global collaboration genes proteins drugs chemicals diseases compound
Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

Beta-catenin-mediated transactivation and cell-cell adhesion pathways are important in curcumin (diferuylmethane)-induced growth arrest and apoptosis in colon cancer cells.

The development of nontoxic natural agents with chemopreventive activity against colon cancer is the focus of investigation in many laboratories. Curcumin (feruylmethane), a natural plant product, possesses such chemopreventive activity, but the mechanisms by which it prevents cancer growth are not well understood. In the present study, we examined the mechanisms by which curcumin treatment affects the growth of colon cancer cells in vitro. Results showed that curcumin treatment causes p53- and p21-independent G(2)/M phase arrest and apoptosis in HCT-116(p53(+/+)), HCT-116(p53(-/-)) and HCT-116(p21(-/-)) cell lines. We further investigated the association of the beta-catenin- mediated c-Myc expression and the cell-cell adhesion pathways in curcumin-induced G(2)/M arrest and apoptosis in HCT-116 cells. Results described a caspase-3-mediated cleavage of beta-catenin, decreased transactivation of beta-catenin/Tcf-Lef, decreased promoter DNA binding activity of the beta-catenin/Tcf-Lef complex, and decreased levels of c-Myc protein. These activities were linked with decreased Cdc2/cyclin B1 kinase activity, a function of the G(2)/M phase arrest. The decreased transactivation of beta-catenin in curcumin-treated HCT-116 cells was unpreventable by caspase-3 inhibitor Z-DEVD-fmk, even though the curcumin-induced cleavage of beta-catenin was blocked in Z-DEVD-fmk pretreated cells. The curcumin treatment also induced caspase-3-mediated degradation of cell-cell adhesion proteins beta-catenin, E-cadherin and APC, which were linked with apoptosis, and this degradation was prevented with the caspase-3 inhibitor. Our results suggest that curcumin treatment impairs both Wnt signaling and cell-cell adhesion pathways, resulting in G(2)/M phase arrest and apoptosis in HCT-116 cells.[1]

References

 
WikiGenes - Universities