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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

The cell surface receptor DC-SIGN discriminates between Mycobacterium species through selective recognition of the mannose caps on lipoarabinomannan.

Interactions between dendritic cells (DCs) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of tuberculosis, most likely play a key role in anti-mycobacterial immunity. We have recently shown that M. tuberculosis binds to and infects DCs through ligation of the DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) and that M. tuberculosis mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM) inhibits binding of the bacilli to the lectin, suggesting that ManLAM might be a key DC-SIGN ligand. In the present study, we investigated the molecular basis of DC-SIGN ligation by LAM. Contrary to what was found for slow growing mycobacteria, such as M. tuberculosis and the vaccine strain Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin, our data demonstrate that the fast growing saprophytic species Mycobacterium smegmatis hardly binds to DC-SIGN. Consistent with the former finding, we show that M. smegmatis-derived lipoarabinomannan, which is capped by phosphoinositide residues (PILAM), exhibits a limited ability to inhibit M. tuberculosis binding to DC-SIGN. Moreover, using enzymatically demannosylated and chemically deacylated ManLAM molecules, we demonstrate that both the acyl chains on the ManLAM mannosylphosphatidylinositol anchor and the mannooligosaccharide caps play a critical role in DC-SIGN-ManLAM interaction. Finally, we report that DC-SIGN binds poorly to the PILAM and uncapped AraLAM-containing species Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium chelonae, respectively. Interestingly, smooth colony-forming Mycobacterium avium, in which ManLAM is capped with single mannose residues, was also poorly recognized by the lectin. Altogether, our results provide molecular insight into the mechanisms of mycobacteria-DC-SIGN interaction, and suggest that DC-SIGN may act as a pattern recognition receptor and discriminate between Mycobacterium species through selective recognition of the mannose caps on LAM molecules.[1]

References

  1. The cell surface receptor DC-SIGN discriminates between Mycobacterium species through selective recognition of the mannose caps on lipoarabinomannan. Maeda, N., Nigou, J., Herrmann, J.L., Jackson, M., Amara, A., Lagrange, P.H., Puzo, G., Gicquel, B., Neyrolles, O. J. Biol. Chem. (2003) [Pubmed]
 
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