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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

High incidence of t(7;12)(q36;p13) in infant AML but not in infant ALL, with a dismal outcome and ectopic expression of HLXB9.

The t(7;12)(q36;p13) is a recurrent translocation involving the ETV6/TEL gene (12p13) and a heterogeneous breakpoint at 7q36. A fusion transcript between HLXB9 and ETV6 in AML with t(7;12) is occasionally found. To study the incidence of t(7;12) in infant and childhood acute leukemia, we screened 320 cases <36 months using FISH. Additionally, 28 pediatric cases >36 months with cytogenetic breakpoints at 12p and 7q were investigated. We studied the presence of an HXLB9-ETV6 fusion transcript and quantified the expression of various genes located in the 7q36 breakpoint region. In total, six AML patients carried the t(7;12) of which five were infants and one child of 18 months. Only one out of 99 infant ALL patients harbored the t(7;12). No t(7;12) was found in older children with AML or ALL. AML patients carrying a t(7;12) had a poor outcome with a 3-year EFS of 0%. A fusion of HLXB9 to ETV6 was found in four AML cases with t(7;12). The 7q36 genes NOM1, LMBR1, RNF32, and SHH were equally expressed among t(7;12)-positive AML versus t(7;12)-negative AML, t(7;12)-negative ALL, or normal bone marrow. However, the HLXB9 expression was highly increased in t(7;12)-positive cases, including those with an HLXB9-ETV6 fusion. We conclude that the t(7;12) is almost exclusively present in infant AML and covers 30% of infant AML, while it is extremely rare in infant ALL and older children. The t(7;12) is associated with a poor outcome and an ectopic expression of HLXB9 is commonly involved in this genetic subtype of leukemia.[1]

References

  1. High incidence of t(7;12)(q36;p13) in infant AML but not in infant ALL, with a dismal outcome and ectopic expression of HLXB9. von Bergh, A.R., van Drunen, E., van Wering, E.R., van Zutven, L.J., Hainmann, I., Lönnerholm, G., Meijerink, J.P., Pieters, R., Beverloo, H.B. Genes Chromosomes Cancer (2006) [Pubmed]
 
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