The world's first wiki where authorship really matters (Nature Genetics, 2008). Due credit and reputation for authors. Imagine a global collaborative knowledge base for original thoughts. Search thousands of articles and collaborate with scientists around the globe.

wikigene or wiki gene protein drug chemical gene disease author authorship tracking collaborative publishing evolutionary knowledge reputation system wiki2.0 global collaboration genes proteins drugs chemicals diseases compound
Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

ELAM-1--dependent cell adhesion to vascular endothelium determined by a transfected human fucosyltransferase cDNA.

Adhesion of circulating leukocytes to the vascular endothelium during inflammation is mediated in part by their interaction with the endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule ELAM-1. ELAM-1, a member of the LEC-CAM family of cell adhesion molecules, expresses an N-terminal carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) homologous to various calcium-dependent mammalian lectins. However, the contribution of the CRD to cell adhesion and its carbohydrate binding specificity have not been elucidated. This study demonstrates that transfection of a human fucosyltransferase cDNA into nonmyeloid cell lines confers ELAM-1--dependent endothelial adhesion. Binding activity correlates with de novo cell surface expression of the sialylated Lewis x tetrasaccharide, whose biosynthesis is determined by the transfected fucosyltransferase cDNA. We propose that specific alpha(1,3)fucosyltransferases regulate cell adhesion to ELAM-1 by modulating cell surface expression of one or more alpha(2,3)sialylated, alpha(1,3)fucosylated lactosaminoglycans represented by the sialyl Lewis x carbohydrate determinant.[1]

References

  1. ELAM-1--dependent cell adhesion to vascular endothelium determined by a transfected human fucosyltransferase cDNA. Lowe, J.B., Stoolman, L.M., Nair, R.P., Larsen, R.D., Berhend, T.L., Marks, R.M. Cell (1990) [Pubmed]
 
WikiGenes - Universities