The world's first wiki where authorship really matters (Nature Genetics, 2008). Due credit and reputation for authors. Imagine a global collaborative knowledge base for original thoughts. Search thousands of articles and collaborate with scientists around the globe.

wikigene or wiki gene protein drug chemical gene disease author authorship tracking collaborative publishing evolutionary knowledge reputation system wiki2.0 global collaboration genes proteins drugs chemicals diseases compound
Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

Characterization and evaluation of immunochemical methods for the measurement of fecal alpha 1-antitrypsin.

Measurement of alpha 1-antitrypsin in feces has been proposed as a method of diagnosing a protein-losing enteropathy. This approach makes use of an endogenous marker rather than radioisotopically labeled materials such as 51CrCl3 or 131albumin to measure protein clearance. The validity of using fecal alpha 1-antitrypsin measurement as a reflection of protein loss through the gastrointestinal tract has been demonstrated by several investigators. The authors report here the characterization of excreted alpha 1-antitrypsin and an evaluation of the immunochemical methods used to measure this protein. They find alpha 1-antitrypsin to be excreted both as a protease-antiprotease complex and in a form that is relatively unaltered compared with serum alpha 1-antitrypsin. The proportion of alpha 1-antitrypsin excreted as a complex was found to vary from patient to patient. Formation of the protease-antiprotease complex was found to decrease the apparent alpha 1-antitrypsin concentration when radial immunodiffusion or immunonephelometry were used. The observed bias was greater for radial immunodiffusion. When these methods were applied to a newborn population at risk for necrotizing enterocolitis, radial immunodiffusion was found to have better sensitivity and a higher predictive value for a positive result than the nephelometric method. The use of fecal alpha 1-antitrypsin for diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy appears to be best accomplished by radial immunodiffusion.[1]

References

 
WikiGenes - Universities