The world's first wiki where authorship really matters (Nature Genetics, 2008). Due credit and reputation for authors. Imagine a global collaborative knowledge base for original thoughts. Search thousands of articles and collaborate with scientists around the globe.

wikigene or wiki gene protein drug chemical gene disease author authorship tracking collaborative publishing evolutionary knowledge reputation system wiki2.0 global collaboration genes proteins drugs chemicals diseases compound
Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

Red cell ouabain-sensitive Na+-K+-adenosine triphosphatase: a state marker in affective disorder inversely related to plasma cortisol.

Ouabain-sensitive Na+-K+-stimulated ATPase was measured in red cell membranes using a spectrophotometric assay. The mean enzyme level in patients in the depressed state (1.2 nM/mg protein per min +/- 0.18 SEM) was lower lower than that in well-state patients (2.0 +/- 0.26) and hypomanic patients (2.4 +/- 0.31). Lithium treatment itself did not alter ATPase levels. Levels in patients in the well state were not significantly different from controls and thus ATPase does not constitute a "trait" marker for affective illness. Plasma cortisol level was higher in well-state patients (15.9 micrograms/dl +/- 1.46) than in controls (11.5 +/- 0.75). There were no significant differences in cortisol in these single morning samples during different mood states. Cortisol level correlated negatively with ATPase level in the total group of patients (r = 0.42, p less than 0.005), especially in those who were euthymic. These data indicate a relationship between cortisol and ATPase levels in affectively ill patients. Ouabain-sensitive NaK ATPase may be useful as an indicator of state in affective illness; plasma cortisol may be continuously elevated in some individuals with affective disorder.[1]

References

  1. Red cell ouabain-sensitive Na+-K+-adenosine triphosphatase: a state marker in affective disorder inversely related to plasma cortisol. Nurnberger, J., Jimerson, D.C., Allen, J.R., Simmons, S., Gershon, E. Biol. Psychiatry (1982) [Pubmed]
 
WikiGenes - Universities