The world's first wiki where authorship really matters (Nature Genetics, 2008). Due credit and reputation for authors. Imagine a global collaborative knowledge base for original thoughts. Search thousands of articles and collaborate with scientists around the globe.

wikigene or wiki gene protein drug chemical gene disease author authorship tracking collaborative publishing evolutionary knowledge reputation system wiki2.0 global collaboration genes proteins drugs chemicals diseases compound
Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

Human cytomegalovirus infection inhibits G1/S transition.

Cell cycle progression during cytomegalovirus infection was investigated by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis of the DNA content in growth-arrested as well as serum-stimulated human fibroblasts. Virus-infected cells maintained in either low (0.2%) or high (10%) serum failed to progress into S phase and failed to divide. DNA content analysis in the presence of G1/S (hydroxyurea and mimosine) and G2/M (nocodazole and colcemid) inhibitors demonstrated that upon virus infection of quiescent (G0) cells, the cell cycle did not progress beyond the G1/S border even after serum stimulation. Proteins which normally indicate G1/S transition (proliferating cell nuclear antigen [PCNA]) or G2/M transition (cyclin B1) were elevated by virus infection. PCNA levels were induced in infected cells and exhibited a punctate pattern of nuclear staining instead of the diffuse pattern observed in mock-infected cells. Cyclin B1 was induced in infected cells which exhibited a G1/S DNA content by FACS analysis, suggesting that expression of this key cell cycle function was dramatically altered by viral functions. These data demonstrate that contrary to expectations, cytomegalovirus inhibits normal cell cycle progression. The host cell is blocked prior to S phase to provide a favorable environment for viral replication.[1]

References

  1. Human cytomegalovirus infection inhibits G1/S transition. Dittmer, D., Mocarski, E.S. J. Virol. (1997) [Pubmed]
 
WikiGenes - Universities