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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 

Fritz Haverkamp

Department of Pediatrics

University of Bonn

Germany

[email]@uni-bonn.de

Name/email consistency: high

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Affiliations

  • Department of Pediatrics, University of Bonn, Germany. 1999 - 2004
  • University Children's Hospital, Adenauerallee 119, 53113 Bonn, Germany. 2003
  • Paediatric Department, Children's Hospital, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms Universitaet, Germany. 2002

References

  1. Risk analyses for the cognitive phenotype in Turner's syndrome: evidence of familial influence as a decisive factor. Haverkamp, F., Zerres, K., Rietz, C., Noeker, M., Ruenger, M. J. Child Neurol. (2004) [Pubmed]
  2. Familial factors and hearing impairment modulate the neuromotor phenotype in Turner syndrome. Haverkamp, F., Keuker, T., Woelfle, J., Kaiser, G., Zerres, K., Rietz, C., Ruenger, M. Eur. J. Pediatr. (2003) [Pubmed]
  3. Psychomotor development in children with early diagnosed giant interhemispheric cysts. Haverkamp, F., Heep, A., Woelfle, J. Dev. Med. Child. Neurol (2002) [Pubmed]
  4. Neurodevelopmental risks in twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome: preliminary findings. Haverkamp, F., Lex, C., Hanisch, C., Fahnenstich, H., Zerres, K. Eur. J. Paediatr. Neurol. (2001) [Pubmed]
  5. Evidence of a specific vulnerability for deficient sequential cognitive information processing in epilepsy. Haverkamp, F., Hanisch, C., Mayer, H., Noeker, M. J. Child Neurol. (2001) [Pubmed]
  6. Growth retardation in Turner syndrome: aneuploidy, rather than specific gene loss, may explain growth failure. Haverkamp, F., Wölfle, J., Zerres, K., Butenandt, O., Amendt, P., Hauffa, B.P., Weimann, E., Bettendorf, M., Keller, E., Mühlenberg, R., Partsch, C.J., Sippell, W.G., Hoppe, C. J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. (1999) [Pubmed]
 
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