The world's first wiki where authorship really matters (Nature Genetics, 2008). Due credit and reputation for authors. Imagine a global collaborative knowledge base for original thoughts. Search thousands of articles and collaborate with scientists around the globe.

wikigene or wiki gene protein drug chemical gene disease author authorship tracking collaborative publishing evolutionary knowledge reputation system wiki2.0 global collaboration genes proteins drugs chemicals diseases compound
Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

Attribution of human papillomavirus types to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cancers in Southern China.

The attribution of individual human papillomavirus (HPV) types to cervical neoplasia, especially intraepithelial lesions, varies ethnogeographically. Population-specific data are required for vaccine cost-effectiveness assessment and type replacement monitoring. HPV was detected from 2,790 Chinese women (444 invasive cervical cancers [ICC], 772 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia [CIN] grade 3, 805 CIN2 and 769 CIN1. The attribution of each HPV type found in multiple-type infections was approximated by the fractional contribution approach. Multiple-type infection was common and correlated inversely with lesion severity (54.7% for CIN1, 48.7% for CIN2, 46.2% for CIN3, 27.5% for ICC). Vaccine-covered high-risk types (HPV16/18) attributed to 59.5% of squamous cell carcinoma, 78.6% of adenocarcinoma, 35.9% of CIN3, 18.4% of CIN2 and 7.4% of CIN1. Distinct features compared to worldwide were a higher attribution of HPV52 and HPV58, and a much lower attribution of HPV45. Inclusion of HPV52 and HPV58 in future vaccines would provide the highest marginal increase in coverage with 11.7% for squamous cell carcinoma, 14.4% for CIN3, 22.6% for CIN2 and 17.7% for CIN1. The attribution of HPV types in southern China is different from elsewhere, which should be considered in prioritizing HPV types for vaccine and screening assay development.[1]

References

  1. Attribution of human papillomavirus types to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cancers in Southern China. Chan, P.K., Cheung, T.H., Li, W.H., Yu, M.Y., Chan, M.Y., Yim, S.F., Ho, W.C., Yeung, A.C., Ho, K.M., Ng, H.K. Int. J. Cancer (2012) [Pubmed]
 
WikiGenes - Universities