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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

The proliferative activity in dysplasia and carcinoma in situ of the uterine cervix analyzed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunostaining and silver-binding argyrophilic nucleolar organizer region staining.

The proliferative activity of dysplasia and carcinoma in situ (CIS) in the uterine cervix was examined using proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunostaining and silver-binding argyrophilic nucleolar organizer region (AgNOR) staining. A significant difference in the labeling index of PCNA immunostaining obtained from dysplastic cells in each histopathologic category was demonstrated between severe dysplasia and CIS. There was no significant difference among each category of dysplasia. The frequency of mitotic figures was highest in CIS, followed in decreasing order by severe, moderate, and mild dysplasia, and was closely correlated with the histopathologic classification. There was an intimate correlation between the PCNA and mitotic indexes in severe dysplasia and CIS. However, the mean numbers of AgNORs in each category of dysplasia and CIS were not significantly different, and there was no apparent relationship with the histologic classification. The PCNA index seemed to be a useful means of evaluating proliferative activity in dysplasia and CIS, and especially in distinguishing CIS from severe dysplasia. In addition, the present PCNA index suggests that a considerable alteration of the biologic behavior involving genetic changes occurs during the progression of carcinogenesis from severe dysplasia to CIS. However, AgNOR staining did not appear to reliably represent the proliferative activity in these lesions.[1]

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