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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

Excitation--contraction uncoupling by a human central core disease mutation in the ryanodine receptor.

Central core disease ( CCD) is a human congenital myopathy characterized by fetal hypotonia and proximal muscle weakness that is linked to mutations in the gene encoding the type-1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1). CCD is thought to arise from Ca(2+)- induced damage stemming from mutant RyR1 proteins forming "leaky" sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release channels. A novel mutation in the C-terminal region of RyR1 (I4898T) accounts for an unusually severe and highly penetrant form of CCD in humans [Lynch, P. J., Tong, J., Lehane, M., Mallet, A., Giblin, L., Heffron, J. J., Vaughan, P., Zafra, G., MacLennan, D. H. & McCarthy, T. V. (1999) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96, 4164--4169]. We expressed in skeletal myotubes derived from RyR1-knockout (dyspedic) mice the analogous mutation engineered into a rabbit RyR1 cDNA (I4897T). Here we show that homozygous expression of I4897T in dyspedic myotubes results in a complete uncoupling of sarcolemmal excitation from voltage-gated SR Ca(2+) release without significantly altering resting cytosolic Ca(2+) levels, SR Ca(2+) content, or RyR1- mediated enhancement of dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR) channel activity. Coexpression of both I4897T and wild-type RyR1 resulted in a 60% reduction in voltage-gated SR Ca(2+) release, again without altering resting cytosolic Ca(2+) levels, SR Ca(2+) content, or DHPR channel activity. These findings indicate that muscle weakness suffered by individuals possessing the I4898T mutation involves a functional uncoupling of sarcolemmal excitation from SR Ca(2+) release, rather than the expression of overactive or leaky SR Ca(2+) release channels.[1]

References

  1. Excitation--contraction uncoupling by a human central core disease mutation in the ryanodine receptor. Avila, G., O'Brien, J.J., Dirksen, R.T. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. (2001) [Pubmed]
 
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