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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

Detection of singlet (1O2) oxygen phosphorescence during chloroperoxidase-catalyzed decomposition of ethyl hydroperoxide.

Evidence for the production of singlet molecular oxygen (1O2) during the chloroperoxidase-catalyzed decomposition of ethyl hydroperoxide has been obtained through the use of optical spectroscopy, oxygen electrode experiments, and electron spin resonance (ESR). ESR spin-trapping experiments with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) demonstrate the production of the ethyl peroxyl free radical during the chloroperoxidase/ethyl hydroperoxide reaction. Oxygen and acetaldehyde concentrations suggest that the production of ethyl peroxyl radicals constitutes less than 2% of the decomposition of ethyl hydroperoxide at the concentrations of reactants used. The phosphorescence of 1O2 at 1268 nm was observed during the chloroperoxidase-catalyzed decomposition of ethyl hydroperoxide in deuterium oxide buffer. Chloroperoxidase also catalyzes the decomposition of tert-butyl hydroperoxide to its corresponding peroxyl radical. Alkoxyl and alkyl-DMPO spin adducts were also detected. A much lower yield of 1O2 phosphorescence was observed during the chloroperoxidase-catalyzed decomposition of tert-butyl hydroperoxide. This phosphorescence probably arises through secondary production of alkyl peroxyl radicals. These results suggest that the initial enzyme-dependent production of ethyl peroxyl radicals is followed by enzyme-independent reaction of two peroxyl radicals through the tetroxide intermediate, as originally proposed by Russell (Russell, G. A. (1957) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 79, 3871-3877), to form acetaldehyde, ethyl alcohol, and molecular oxygen.[1]

References

  1. Detection of singlet (1O2) oxygen phosphorescence during chloroperoxidase-catalyzed decomposition of ethyl hydroperoxide. Hall, R.D., Chamulitrat, W., Takahashi, N., Chignell, C.F., Mason, R.P. J. Biol. Chem. (1989) [Pubmed]
 
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