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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

Reactivities of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies raised to the major capsid protein of human papillomavirus type 16.

Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have been raised against a fusion protein containing beta-galactosidase and part of the major capsid protein L1 of the human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16. The polyclonal antibodies cross-reacted with the L1 protein of several HPV types including HPV-1, -2, -6 and -11 when reacted with virus-infected tissue sections, and with HPV-6 and -18 L1 fusion proteins on Western blotting. Monoclonal antibodies against the L1 fusion protein of HPV-16 reacted only with HPV-16 L1 fusion proteins on Western blots and with HPV-16-containing biopsy sections as assessed by in situ DNA-DNA hybridization. These antibodies did not detect HPV-6 L1 protein after Western blotting or in HPV-6-infected tissue sections, although one did react with an HPV-18 fusion protein after Western blotting. The monoclonal antibodies were able to detect HPV-16 antigens in routine formaldehyde-fixed, wax-embedded sections of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia sections. HPV-16 L1 proteins were seen in one-third of biopsies that were positive using the polyclonal cross-reacting antisera. Polyclonal antibodies to fusion proteins containing part of the minor capsid protein L2 of HPV-6 or -16 appeared to be more type-specific as no cross-reactivity was seen when these antibodies were reacted with HPV-1- and -2-infected tissue sections.[1]

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