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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

The cytoplasmic domain of the H-2Ld class I major histocompatibility complex molecule is differentially accessible to immunological and biochemical probes during transport to the cell surface.

An antiserum was generated against a synthetic peptide corresponding to a portion of the cytoplasmic domains of the H-2Ld and H-2Db class I major histocompatibility complex molecules of the mouse. This antibody preparation, R4, binds exclusively to endoglycosidase H-resistant H-2Ld/Db molecules which are not associated with beta 2-microglobulin. Interestingly, acquisition of resistance to endoglycosidase H precedes acquisition of R4 reactivity by 30 min. R4-reactive H-2Ld and H-2Db molecules occur on the cell surface and are phosphorylated in vivo. Other studies show that the tyrosine in the cytoplasmic domain is accessible to radioiodination on only a subset of H-2Ld molecules, and that the two-dimensional electrophoretic profiles of phosphorylated H-2L/Db molecules, of R4-reactive molecules, and of H-2Ld molecules radiolabeled on this cytoplasmic domain tyrosine are virtually identical. R4-reactive H-2Ld molecules do not undergo the peptide- and beta 2-microglobulin- induced conformational changes characteristic of free class I major histocompatibility complex heavy chains. The accessibility of the H-2Ld cytoplasmic domain to R4 and to radioiodination late in biosynthesis and its biological significance are discussed.[1]

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