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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

Estrogen replacement in surgical stage I and II endometrial cancer survivors.

OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to evaluate our experience with estrogen replacement in women with a history of early-stage endometrial cancer and to determine whether it increased the risk for recurrence or death. STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective review was performed of 123 women with surgical stage I and II endometrial adenocarcinoma treated between 1984 and 1994; 62 had received estrogen replacement therapy after cancer therapy. Sixty-one women received no estrogen. Variables analyzed included age parity, surgical stage, grade, depth of myometrial invasion, presence of intercurrent illnesses, duration of follow-up, and duration of estrogen replacement, if applicable. Outcome variables assessed included recurrence rate, time to recurrence, and disease-free interval. RESULTS: The estrogen replacement therapy group had earlier stage disease (p = 0.04) and less severe depth of invasion (p = 0.003); however, the total number of deaths in each group was not significantly different. The disease-free survival in the estrogen replacement therapy group did not differ significantly compared with those not receiving estrogen replacement therapy. The data are suggestive of improved disease-free survival in the estrogen replacement therapy group, which may be related to differences in age, stage, grade, and depth of invasion. The overall recurrence rate was 6.5%, with an overall death rate of 1.6%. CONCLUSIONS: There is no evidence to suggest that estrogen decreased the disease-free interval or increased the risk for recurrence in early-stage disease.[1]

References

  1. Estrogen replacement in surgical stage I and II endometrial cancer survivors. Chapman, J.A., DiSaia, P.J., Osann, K., Roth, P.D., Gillotte, D.L., Berman, M.L. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. (1996) [Pubmed]
 
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