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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

Molecular epidemiology of penicillin-non-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from children with invasive pneumococcal disease in Germany.

A population-based nationwide surveillance of antibiotic resistance associated with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children and adolescents (aged<16 years) was performed in Germany between 1997 and 2004. In total, 1517 isolates were collected, of which 5.1% and 1.1% were intermediately- or fully-resistant, respectively, to penicillin G. During the 8-year study period, an increase in resistance to both penicillin G and erythromycin A was observed, and the frequency of isolates exhibiting reduced susceptibility to penicillin G or erythromycin A increased from 1.4% and 11.1%, respectively, in 1997, to 8.7% and 29.0%, respectively, in 2004. Among the penicillin non-susceptible pneumococcal isolates, serotypes 14 (24.5% of isolates), 23F (16.0%) and 6B (16.0%) were found most frequently. Multilocus sequence typing of 58 (62%) penicillin G non-susceptible isolates revealed that sequence type (ST) 156 (Spain9V-3 clone) and its single-locus variant ST 557 were widespread in Germany. Moreover, 17 new penicillin G non-susceptible STs were defined for the first time. The study illustrated the genetic heterogeneity of antibiotic-resistant pneumococcal isolates in Germany.[1]

References

  1. Molecular epidemiology of penicillin-non-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from children with invasive pneumococcal disease in Germany. Reinert, R.R., van der Linden, M., Seegmüller, I., Al-Lahham, A., Siedler, A., Weissmann, B., Toschke, A.M., von Kries, R. Clin. Microbiol. Infect. (2007) [Pubmed]
 
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