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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

The construction of viable nuclear-cytoplasmic hybrid cells by nuclear transplantation.

Using the mouse L-cell line as a model system, a generalized approach is presented for nuclear transplantation in cultured cells resulting in the construction of cytoplasmic-nuclear hybrid cells. Techniques were developed for the preparation of cytoplast and karyoplasts having minimum contamination by parent whole cells. Sendai virusmediated fusion was performed in a manner which maximized the formation of the desired fusion products-cells having one cell equivalent of cytoplasm from one parent and a nucleus from a second parent. The viability of the fusion products was established by examination of photographic records of the developing cultures. Using these techniques, we found that nuclei could be introduced routinely into 10-30% of a cytoplast culture. From determinations of the increase in cell number with time, it was estimated that at least 30% of the reconstructed cells were capable of division. The approach was next applied to the formation of hybrid cells from L-cell cytoplasts and A9 cell karyoplasts. The A9 cell line is an azaguanine-resistant derivative of L cells. Thus any whole cells remaining in the culture of fused cells were readily eliminated by treatment with the purine analogue. The culture of remaining cytoplasmic-nuclear hybrid cells grew to confluence in the presence of azaguanine. The applicability of the approach to the construction of hybrid cells using parent lines from different organisms is briefly discussed.[1]

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