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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

Feedback regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 expression by the Rev protein.

Rev is an essential regulatory protein of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) that affects the transport and half-life of certain viral mRNAs. Rev exerts its function via a unique element, the Rev-responsive element (RRE), located within the env region of HIV-1. It has been previously demonstrated that Rev affects the relative levels of RRE-containing and RRE-lacking mRNAs. We have studied the effects of Rev on the expression of the three different groups of small, multiply spliced mRNAs that lack the RRE sequence and encode the regulatory proteins Tat, Rev, and Nef. To monitor the tat, rev, and nef mRNAs we generated specific S1 nuclease mapping probes that distinguish among them. Analysis of all the mRNA species producing Tat, Rev, and Nef revealed that their levels are coordinately regulated by Rev. They are increased in the absence of Rev protein and are down regulated in the presence of Rev. The corresponding proteins were measured by immunoprecipitations, and their levels are in agreement with the RNA levels. These results verify the model proposing that Rev is a general regulator indirectly affecting all the multiply spliced mRNAs to a similar extent. Therefore, Rev down regulates its own expression and the expression of Tat and Nef.[1]

References

  1. Feedback regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 expression by the Rev protein. Felber, B.K., Drysdale, C.M., Pavlakis, G.N. J. Virol. (1990) [Pubmed]
 
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