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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

Nucleotide sequence of the Drosophila glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene and comparison with the homologous human gene.

Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase ( G6PD) has a major role in NADPH production and is found in almost all cell types. The structural gene for G6PD is X-linked in Drosophila melanogaster, as it is in most eukaryotic organisms, and due to its ubiquitous expression, it can be considered a typical 'housekeeping' gene. Here we present the complete nucleotide (nt) sequence of G6PD cDNAs as well as the genomic copy of the G6PD gene. The G6PD gene has three introns so that the protein-coding region is divided into four segments. The 5'-end of mature G6PD mRNA is located 289 +/- 1 nt upstream from the start codon. The sequence upstream from the transcription start point is G + T-rich and contains no commonly found transcription regulatory elements, such as a TATA box or GGGCGG sequence. D. melanogaster G6PD is 65% homologous with the human G6PD protein but has no homology with the human sequence for the first 42 amino acid residues. The G6PD gene was shown to be active when transduced to autosomal positions. For each transformant, G6PD activity in both male and female adults was not significantly different, indicating that the transduced gene, unlike the resident G6PD, is not dosage-compensated in males.[1]

References

  1. Nucleotide sequence of the Drosophila glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene and comparison with the homologous human gene. Fouts, D., Ganguly, R., Gutierrez, A.G., Lucchesi, J.C., Manning, J.E. Gene (1988) [Pubmed]
 
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