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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

Comparative purification and characterization of invertebrate muscle glycogen synthase from the porcine parasite Ascaris suum.

Glycogen synthase has been purified from the obliquely striated muscle of the swine parasite Ascaris suum. The muscle contains a concentration of glycogen synthase and glycogen which is 20-fold and 15-fold, respectively, greater than rabbit skeletal muscle. The enzyme could not be solubilized with salivary amylase, but partial solubilization was achieved by activation of endogenous phosphorylase. The enzyme was purified to 85-90% homogeneity (specific activity = 4.3 units/mg) by DEAE-cellulose, Sepharose 4B, and glucosamine 6-phosphate chromatography. The purified glycogen synthase was substantially similar to rabbit skeletal muscle enzyme with respect to Mr (gel electrophoresis and gel filtration), pH dependence, aggregation properties, temperature dependence, and kinetic constants for substrates and activators. Glycogen synthase I was converted to glycogen synthase D by the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. The cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase catalyzed the incorporation of 1.3 mol of phosphate into each glycogen synthase I subunit and the concomitant interconversion to glycogen synthase D. Since glycogen is the sole fuel utilized by this organism during nonfeeding periods of the host, the characterization of this enzyme provides further insight into the regulatory mechanisms which determine glycogen turnover.[1]

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