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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

Degradation of parathyroid hormone and fragment production by the isolated perfused dog kidney. The effect of glomerular filtration rate and perfusate CA++ concentrations.

The renal degradation of intact bovine parathyroid hormone (b-PTH 1-84) was studied with the isolated perfused dog kidney. Disappearance of b-PTH 1-84 from the perfusate occurred concomitantly with the appearance of smaller molecular weight forms of immunoreactive parathyroid hormone (PTH). These smaller molecular weight PTH fragments included both carboxyl and amino terminal regions of the PTH peptide. Perfusate from kidneys with lower glomerular filtration rates (GFR) contained b-PTH 1-84 for longer periods of time than kidneys with higher GFRs, and perfusate from kidneys with lower GFRs demonstrated greater accumulation of carboxyl terminal PTH fragments. Perfusate containing high Ca++ concentrations retarded, and perfusate with low Ca++ concentrations accelerated the rate of degradation of b-PTH 1-84 by the kidney. These studies, therefore document the production of PTH fragments during the course of intact hormone degradation by the kidney. They also demonstrate renal clearance of the PTH fragments produced and define the effects of glomerular filtration rate and calcium concentrations on degradation of intact hormone and the clearance of PTH fragments.[1]

References

  1. Degradation of parathyroid hormone and fragment production by the isolated perfused dog kidney. The effect of glomerular filtration rate and perfusate CA++ concentrations. Hruska, K.A., Martin, K., Mennes, P., Greenwalt, A., Anderson, C., Klahr, S., Slatopolsky, E. J. Clin. Invest. (1977) [Pubmed]
 
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