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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

Plasmin converts factor X from coagulation zymogen to fibrinolysis cofactor.

Known anticoagulant pathways have been shown to exclusively inhibit blood coagulation cofactors and enzymes. In the current work, we first investigated the possibility of a novel anticoagulant mechanism that functions at the level of zymogen inactivation. Utilizing both clotting and chromogenic assays, the fibrinolysis protease plasmin was found to irreversibly inhibit the pivotal function of factor X (FX) in coagulation. This was due to cleavage at several sites, the location of which were altered by association of FX with procoagulant phospholipid (proPL). The final products were approximately 28 and approximately 47 kDa for proPL-bound and unbound FX, respectively, which did not have analogues when activated FX (FXa) was cleaved instead. We next investigated whether the FX derivatives could interact with the plasmin precursor plasminogen, and we found that plasmin exposed a binding site only on proPL-bound FX. The highest apparent affinity was for the 28-kDa fragment, which was identified as the light subunit disulfide linked to a small fragment of the heavy subunit (Met-296 to approximately Lys-330). After cleavage by plasmin, proPL-bound FX furthermore was observed to accelerate plasmin generation by tissue plasminogen activator. Thus, a feedback mechanism localized by proPL is suggested in which plasmin simultaneously inhibits FX clotting function and converts proPL-bound FX into a fibrinolysis cofactor. These data also provide the first evidence for an anticoagulant mechanism aimed directly at the zymogen FX.[1]

References

  1. Plasmin converts factor X from coagulation zymogen to fibrinolysis cofactor. Pryzdial, E.L., Lavigne, N., Dupuis, N., Kessler, G.E. J. Biol. Chem. (1999) [Pubmed]
 
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