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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

Plasma growth hormone, insulin, and glucagon responses to arginine infusion in children and adolescents with idiopathic short stature, isolated growth hormone deficiency, panhypopituitarism, and anorexia nervosa.

The effects of intravenous infusion of arginine (20 g/m2) after an overnight fast on plasma immunoreactive growth hormone ( GH), insulin (IRI), and glucagon (IRG), and blood glucose were examined in five groups of children and adolescents: 10 normal individuals, 18 with idiopathic short stature, 6 with isolated growth hormone deficiency, 8 with panhypopituitarism, and 6 with anorexia nervosa. The mean fasting plasma GH concentration was significantly elevated in the group with anorexia nervosa (P less than 0.05), and similar to the value for the normal group in all other groups. After arginine infusion, four- to sixfold increases of plasma GH were observed in the normal children, and similar increases were seen in those with idiopathic short stature as well as in those with anorexia nervosa; whereas, in the children with isolated growth hormone deficiency or panhypopituitarism, there was no significant increase in plasma GH. Fasting blood glucose concentrations were significantly lower than normal in subjects with isolated growth hormone deficiency (P less than 0.05), panhypopituitarism (P less than 0.001), and anorexia nervosa (P less than 0.001), whereas fasting plasma IRI and IRG concentrations were similar to the values in the normal group. Plasma IRI increased eightfold at the end of the 30-min arginine infusion in the normal subjects; the increase was slightly but not significantly less in those with idiopathic short stature, and significantly less in those with isolated growth hormone deficiency (P less than 0.05), panhypopituitarism (P less than 0.001), and anorexia nervosa (P less than 0.05). Arginine infusion resulted in two- to threefold increases of plasma IRG in the normal group, and similar increases were observed in all of the other groups tested. These results suggest that whereas pancreatic beta cell responsiveness may be deficient in children and adolescents with isolated growth hormone deficiency, panhypopituitarism, or anorexia nervosa, pancreatic alpha cell responsiveness, to arginine at least, appears to be intact under these conditions.[1]

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