The world's first wiki where authorship really matters (Nature Genetics, 2008). Due credit and reputation for authors. Imagine a global collaborative knowledge base for original thoughts. Search thousands of articles and collaborate with scientists around the globe.

wikigene or wiki gene protein drug chemical gene disease author authorship tracking collaborative publishing evolutionary knowledge reputation system wiki2.0 global collaboration genes proteins drugs chemicals diseases compound
Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

Comparison of granisetron, droperidol, and metoclopramide for prevention of postoperative vomiting in children with a history of motion sickness undergoing tonsillectomy.

BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: A history of motion sickness is one of the patient-related factors associated with postoperative vomiting (POV). This study was undertaken to compare the efficacy of granisetron, droperidol, and metoclopramide for the prevention of POV after tonsillectomy in children with a history of motion sickness. METHODS: In a prospective, randomized, double-blinded trial, 90 pediatric patients, aged 4 to 10 years, received granisetron, 40 microg/kg; droperidol, 50 microg/kg; or metoclopramide, 0.25 mg/kg (n = 30 of each) intravenously after an inhalation induction of anesthesia. Emetic episodes and safety assessments were performed during the first 24 hours after anesthesia. RESULTS: Twenty-two of 30 patients (73%) who had received granisetron were emesis free during the first 24 hours after surgery as compared with 7 of 30 (23%) who had received droperidol (P <.05) or 6 of 30 (20%) who had received metoclopramide (P <.05). No clinically serious adverse events were observed in any of the groups. CONCLUSION: Prophylactic therapy with granisetron is superior to droperidol or metoclopramide for the prevention of POV after tonsillectomy in children with a history of motion sickness.[1]

References

 
WikiGenes - Universities