The world's first wiki where authorship really matters (Nature Genetics, 2008). Due credit and reputation for authors. Imagine a global collaborative knowledge base for original thoughts. Search thousands of articles and collaborate with scientists around the globe.

wikigene or wiki gene protein drug chemical gene disease author authorship tracking collaborative publishing evolutionary knowledge reputation system wiki2.0 global collaboration genes proteins drugs chemicals diseases compound
Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

Genomic regions controlling corticosterone levels in rats.

BACKGROUND: The identification of genetic factors controlling stress-responsiveness should advance the understanding of susceptibility to psychiatric illness. METHODS: Rat strains, F344/NHsd and LEW/NHsd, which differ in measures of stress-responsiveness and behaviors modeling psychiatric disorders, were bred to generate F2 progeny that were used in a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis to identify genomic regions influencing late-afternoon corticosterone levels. RESULTS: Regions on chromosomes 4 and 10 previously identified as influencing autoimmune phenomena were the most significant QTL observed, reaching suggestive significance at the genome-wide level. Congenic animals targeting these regions with F344/NHsd deoxyribonucleic acid on a DA/Bkl genomic background demonstrated corticosterone levels approximating those of F344/NHsd rats and differing significantly from DA/Bkl rats. CONCLUSIONS: Specific genomic regions influence both corticosterone levels and stress-related disease susceptibility. These findings not only represent the first identification of QTL controlling corticosterone levels but also suggest a mechanism underlying genetic differences in stress-responsiveness.[1]

References

  1. Genomic regions controlling corticosterone levels in rats. Potenza, M.N., Brodkin, E.S., Joe, B., Luo, X., Remmers, E.F., Wilder, R.L., Nestler, E.J., Gelernter, J. Biol. Psychiatry (2004) [Pubmed]
 
WikiGenes - Universities