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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

Development of a new radioligand, N-(5-fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl-5-methoxybenzyl)acetamide, for pet imaging of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor in primate brain.

To develop a positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for imaging the 'peripheral benzodiazepine receptor' ( PBR) in brain and elucidating the relationship between PBR and brain diseases, four analogues (4-7) of N-(2,5-dimethoxybenzyl)-N-(5-fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)acetamide (2) were synthesized and evaluated as ligands for PBR. Of these compounds, fluoromethyl (4) and fluoroethyl (5) analogues had similar or higher affinities for PBR than the parent compound 2 (K(i) = 0.16 nM for PBR in rat brain sections). Iodomethyl analogue 6 displayed a moderate affinity, whereas tosyloxyethyl analogue 7 had weak affinity. Radiolabeling was performed for the fluoroalkyl analogues 4 and 5 using fluorine-18 ((18)F, beta(+); 96.7%, T(1/2) = 109.8 min). Ligands [(18)F]4 and [(18)F]5 were respectively synthesized by the alkylation of desmethyl precursor 3 with [(18)F]fluoromethyl iodide ([(18)F]8) and 2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl bromide ([(18)F]9). The distribution patterns of [(18)F]4 and [(18)F]5 in mice were consistent with the known distribution of PBR. However, compared with [(18)F]5, [(18)F]4 displayed a high uptake in the bone of mice. The PET image of [(18)F]4 for monkey brain also showed significant radioactivity in the bone, suggesting that this ligand was unstable for in vivo defluorination and was not a useful PET ligand. Ligand [(18)F]5 displayed a high uptake in monkey brain especially in the occipital cortex, a region with richer PBR than the other regions in the brain. The radioactivity level of [(18)F]5 in monkey brain was 1.5 times higher than that of [(11)C]2, and 6 times higher than that of (R)-(1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-[(11)C]methyl,N-(1-methylpropyl)isoquinoline ([(11)C]1). Moreover, the in vivo binding of [(18)F]5 was significantly inhibited by PBR-selective 2 or 1, indicating that the binding of [(18)F]5 in the monkey brain was mainly due to PBR. Metabolite analysis revealed that [(18)F]4 was rapidly metabolized by defluorination to [(18)F]F(-) in the plasma and brain of mice, whereas [(18)F]5 was metabolized by debenzylation to a polar product [(18)F]13 only in the plasma. No radioactive metabolite of [(18)F]5 was detected in the mouse brain. The biological data indicate that [(18)F]5 is a useful PET ligand for PBR and is currently used for imaging PBR in human brain.[1]

References

  1. Development of a new radioligand, N-(5-fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl-5-methoxybenzyl)acetamide, for pet imaging of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor in primate brain. Zhang, M.R., Maeda, J., Ogawa, M., Noguchi, J., Ito, T., Yoshida, Y., Okauchi, T., Obayashi, S., Suhara, T., Suzuki, K. J. Med. Chem. (2004) [Pubmed]
 
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