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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

Quantitative, standardized assays for determining the concentrations of bovine lactoperoxidase, human salivary peroxidase, and human myeloperoxidase.

Because of the important biological functions of peroxidases, there is growing interest in the measurement of their concentrations in various secretions. At present, there is no standard method which allows for comparisons in reported activities. This report describes procedures which can be used to measure peroxidase enzyme concentrations by commonly employed assays. Regression equations have been determined which can be used to calculate concentrations of bovine lactoperoxidase (LPO), human salivary peroxidase (SPO), and human myeloperoxidase (MPO) from activities measured with the following donors: pyrogallol, guaiacol, 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzylthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), and thiocyanate (SCN-). The peroxidation rates of these donors depend upon the concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) used in the individual assays and thus, for accurate, reproducible results, these concentrations must be carefully controlled. The SCN- normally present in human saliva will reduce observed reaction rates by simple competition kinetics in the ABTS, guaiacol and pyrogallol assays and will increase the rates observed when Cl- is used as a donor in NBS assay for MPO. Therefore, SCN- must be removed from saliva samples prior to peroxidase activity determination by all assays except the thionitrobenzoic acid ( NBS) assay. LPO cannot be used as a standard for either SPO or MPO because the specific activities of LPO, SPO, and MPO are significantly different.[1]

References

  1. Quantitative, standardized assays for determining the concentrations of bovine lactoperoxidase, human salivary peroxidase, and human myeloperoxidase. Pruitt, K.M., Kamau, D.N., Miller, K., Månsson-Rahemtulla, B., Rahemtulla, F. Anal. Biochem. (1990) [Pubmed]
 
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