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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced rat mammary tumors. Hormone responsiveness but lack of spontaneous metastasis.

N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) given iv to rats 50-55 days old induced mammary tumors in 70% of F344/N and 91% W/ICRF inbred females with mean latency periods of 149 and 93 days, respectively. Reduction of the MNU dose did not affect tumor incidence in W/ICRF rats. Of the mammary tumors, 98% were classified histologically as adenocarcinomas, which grew progressively. Primary tumors of nonmammary origin were detected at low incidence. Upon histologic examination, no evidence was found for metastases of either the mammary or other primary tumors. No evidence for tumor-induced hypercalcemia was found. Oophorectomy at the time of MNU administration prevented tumor development; oophorectomy when at least 1 tumor/animal was palpable caused growth delay or regression. All MNU-induced and 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced mammary tumors tested contained cytoplasmic estrogen receptor ( ER) at similar concentrations and were indistinguishable histologically. MNU-induced tumors in F344 rats were transplantable and retained ER through three transplantations.[1]

References

  1. N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced rat mammary tumors. Hormone responsiveness but lack of spontaneous metastasis. Williams, J.C., Gusterson, B., Humphreys, J., Monaghan, P., Coombes, R.C., Rudland, P., Neville, A.M. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. (1981) [Pubmed]
 
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