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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

Decreased dihydropyridine receptor number in hypertensive rat vascular muscle cells.

To further investigate the altered function of Ca2+ channels in vascular muscle cells in hypertension, a novel fluorescently labeled dihydropyridine was used with ultrahigh-sensitivity photometry to study dihydropyridine binding sites on the surface membrane of living vascular muscle cells from stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats and their normotensive controls. Fluorescent nitrobenzoxadiazol-6-dihydropyridine in concentrations of 1 to 100 nmol/L bound specifically to vascular muscle cells' Ca2+ channels, and was displaced by the unlabeled dihydropyridine analogue or nisoldipine (10 mumol/L). Stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat vascular muscle cells showed significantly decreased binding of nitrobenzoxadiazol-6-dihydropyridine compared with normotensive National Institutes of Health rats. Decreased binding of dihydropyridine by vascular muscle cells from stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (cells that in other studies show increased Ca2+ channel function) indicates a change in channel regulation that is possibly due to a deficiency in the inactivation mechanism, consistent with our earlier electrophysiological studies reporting deficiencies in Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation in genetic hypertension. These data demonstrate decreased numbers of localized sites of dihydropyridine binding on the sarcolemma of living vascular muscle cells, and support the hypothesis that Ca2+ channel alterations may significantly contribute to the molecular etiology of genetic hypertension.[1]

References

  1. Decreased dihydropyridine receptor number in hypertensive rat vascular muscle cells. Hermsmeyer, K., White, A.C., Triggle, D.J. Hypertension (1995) [Pubmed]
 
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