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GSY1  -  glycogen (starch) synthase GSY1

Saccharomyces cerevisiae S288c

Synonyms: YFR015C
 
 
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High impact information on GSY1

  • Expression of GSY1 was dependent upon the presence of a TATA box and two stress response elements (STREs) [1].
  • GSY1 resides on chromosome VI, and GSY2 is located on chromosome XII [2].
  • The amino-terminal sequence obtained from the 85,000-dalton species matched the NH2 terminus predicted by the GSY1 sequence [3].
  • Disruption of the GSY1 gene resulted in a viable haploid with glycogen synthase activity, and purification of glycogen synthase from this mutant strain resulted in an enzyme that contained the 77,000-dalton polypeptide [3].
  • The data are explained if S. cerevisiae has two glycogen synthase genes encoding proteins with significant sequence similarity The protein sequence predicted by the GSY1 gene lacks the extreme NH2-terminal phosphorylation sites of the mammalian enzymes [3].

References

  1. Multiple positive and negative elements involved in the regulation of expression of GSY1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Unnikrishnan, I., Miller, S., Meinke, M., LaPorte, D.C. J. Biol. Chem. (2003) [Pubmed]
  2. Two glycogen synthase isoforms in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are coded by distinct genes that are differentially controlled. Farkas, I., Hardy, T.A., Goebl, M.G., Roach, P.J. J. Biol. Chem. (1991) [Pubmed]
  3. Isolation of the GSY1 gene encoding yeast glycogen synthase and evidence for the existence of a second gene. Farkas, I., Hardy, T.A., DePaoli-Roach, A.A., Roach, P.J. J. Biol. Chem. (1990) [Pubmed]
 
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