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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

Female with autistic disorder and monosomy X (Turner syndrome): parent-of-origin effect of the X chromosome.

We have ascertained and examined a patient with autistic disorder (AD) and monosomy X (Turner syndrome). The patient met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV)/International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) criteria for AD verified by the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised. The patient exhibited both social and verbal deficits and manifested the classical physical features associated with monosomy X. Skuse et al. [1997: Nature 387:705-708] reported three such cases of AD and monosomy X in their study of Turner syndrome and social cognition. They observed that monosomy X females with a maternally inherited X chromosome had reduced social cognition when compared with monosomy X females with a paternally inherited X chromosome. All three cases of AD and monosomy X were maternally inherited. Based on their data, they suggested that there was a gene for social cognition on the X chromosome that is imprinted and not expressed when the X chromosome is of maternal origin. Thus, we conducted parent-of-origin studies in our AD/monosomy X patient by genotyping X chromosome markers in the patient and her family. We found that the patient's X chromosome was of maternal origin. These findings represent the fourth documented case of maternal inheritance of AD and monosomy X and provide further support for the hypothesis that parent-of-origin of the X chromosome influences social cognition.[1]

References

  1. Female with autistic disorder and monosomy X (Turner syndrome): parent-of-origin effect of the X chromosome. Donnelly, S.L., Wolpert, C.M., Menold, M.M., Bass, M.P., Gilbert, J.R., Cuccaro, M.L., Delong, G.R., Pericak-Vance, M.A. Am. J. Med. Genet. (2000) [Pubmed]
 
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