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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

In vivo manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging reveals connections and functional properties of the songbird vocal control system.

Injection of manganese (Mn(2+)), a paramagnetic tract tracing agent and calcium analogue, into the high vocal center of starlings labeled within a few hours the nucleus robustus archistriatalis and area X as observed by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging. Structures highlighted by Mn(2+) accumulation assumed the expected tri-dimensional shape of the nucleus robustus archistriatalis and area X as identified by classical histological or neurochemical methods. The volume of these nuclei could be accurately calculated by segmentation of the areas highlighted by Mn(2+). Besides confirming previously established volumetric sex differences, Mn(2+) uptake into these nuclei revealed new functional sex differences affecting Mn(2+) transport. A faster transport was observed in males than in females and different relative amounts of Mn(2+) were transported to nucleus robustus archistriatalis and area X in males as compared to females.This new in vivo approach, allowing repeated measures, opens new vistas to study the remarkable seasonal plasticity in size and activity of song-control nuclei and correlate neuronal activity with behavior. It also provides new insights on in vivo axonal transport and neuronal activity in song-control nuclei of oscines.[1]

References

  1. In vivo manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging reveals connections and functional properties of the songbird vocal control system. Van der Linden, A., Verhoye, M., Van Meir, V., Tindemans, I., Eens, M., Absil, P., Balthazart, J. Neuroscience (2002) [Pubmed]
 
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