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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

Three cases of cochleosaccular endolymphatic hydrops without vertigo revealed by furosemide-loading vestibular evoked myogenic potential test.

OBJECTIVE: To describe possible cases of cochleosaccular endolymphatic hydrops without vertigo. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case report. SETTING: University hospital. PATIENTS: Three patients with possible cochleosaccular hydrops without vertigo were studied. The basis of diagnosis was positive result of the furosemide-loading vestibular evoked myogenic potential test, no canal paresis in the caloric test, and recurrent cochlear symptoms or fluctuating low-tone hearing loss. CASE REPORT: In case 1, a 47-year-old woman had recurrent left aural fullness and tinnitus and a few weeks later complained of a floating sensation and could not stand up. The furosemide-loading vestibular evoked myogenic potential test showed a positive result in the left ear. In case 2, a 24-year-old woman complained of a backward falling sensation lasting several seconds; subsequently, a severe floating sensation persisted and she could not stand up for several days. Audiography showed fluctuating low-tone hearing loss in the left ear, and the furosemide-loading vestibular evoked myogenic potential test showed a positive result. In case 3, a 41-year-old woman had a floating sensation while walking and subsequently complained of tinnitus in the left ear. She could not stand up because of a severe floating sensation and, moreover, complained of a sudden falling sensation lasting for several seconds. The furosemide-loading vestibular evoked myogenic potential test indicated a positive result in the left ear. CONCLUSIONS: The patients in cases 2 and 3 complained of a short-lasting sensation of falling down. Severe disequilibrium that prohibited standing up was noted in all cases. It was suggested that these symptoms were caused by saccular hydrops.[1]

References

  1. Three cases of cochleosaccular endolymphatic hydrops without vertigo revealed by furosemide-loading vestibular evoked myogenic potential test. Seo, T., Node, M., Miyamoto, A., Yukimasa, A., Terada, T., Sakagami, M. Otol. Neurotol. (2003) [Pubmed]
 
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