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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

Adhesion and cell-surface-hydrophobicity of sequentially isolated genetic isotypes of Candida albicans in an HIV-infected Southern Chinese cohort.

Objectives of the study were to investigate the variability in yeast adhesion and cell-surface-hydrophobicity (CSH) during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression, using a total of 60 sequential Candida albicans isolated from oral rinse samples of seven HIV-infected individuals with (4) and without (3) clinical symptoms of oropharyngeal candidosis. Significant differences in the adhesion to buccal epithelial cells (BECs) during sequential visits were observed for all genetic isotypes in five of the seven individuals and three isotypes belonging to the sixth individual. A single isotype of patient HK1 and another of HK4 (genotype I) demonstrated significant variations in their CSH during sequential visits whereas no such differences were noted for the remaining genotypes. On Spearman correlation analysis an isotype from HK1 demonstrated a significant increased adherence to BECs and CSH during HIV disease progression whereas no such correlation was noted for the remaining isotypes studied. No significant differences in adherence to BECs or CSH values were observed between the symptomatic oral candidosis and the asymptomatic carrier group. Further, on regression analysis only the single isotype of HK1 demonstrated a significant positive correlation between adherence to BECs and CSH whereas no such correlation was observed when all tested Candida isolates were pooled and evaluated as a single, large group.[1]

References

  1. Adhesion and cell-surface-hydrophobicity of sequentially isolated genetic isotypes of Candida albicans in an HIV-infected Southern Chinese cohort. Samaranayake, Y.H., Samaranayake, L.P., Yau, J.Y., Ellepola, A.N., Anil, S., Yeung, K.W. Mycoses (2003) [Pubmed]
 
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