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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

Subcellular localization and mobilization of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 8 in human neutrophils.

The subcellular localization and mobilization of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 8 (CEACAM8) was investigated quantitatively in human neutrophils. In resting neutrophils the majority of CEACAM8 was present in the secondary granules, and a small amount of CEACAM8 was present in a light membrane fraction. Stimulation of the neutrophils with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate caused a dramatic increase in the content of CEACAM8 in the light membrane fraction, suggesting a translocation of CEACAM8 to the plasma membrane from intracellular pools. The cellular content of CEACAM8 in the neutrophils was estimated to be 82.4 +/- 8.9 ng/10(6) cells (mean +/- SE, n = 10). Administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to healthy individuals resulted in an increased content of CEACAM8 in neutrophils on day 1, which decreased on day 4. However, the content of CEACAM8 in the light membrane fraction was increased on day 4, possibly due to the stimulation by induced secondary cytokines, such as tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). This study establishes the secondary granules as the major intracellular pools of CEACAM8 in human neutrophils, from which it may translocate to the plasma membranes upon stimulation of the cells. The translocation of CEACAM8 seen in vivo after G-CSF administration is probably indirect and caused by cytokines such as TNF-alpha.[1]

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