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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

A critical role for cyclin E in cell fate determination in the central nervous system of Drosophila melanogaster.

We have examined the process by which cell diversity is generated in neuroblast (NB) lineages in the central nervous system of Drosophila melanogaster. Thoracic NB6-4 (NB6-4t) generates both neurons and glial cells, whereas NB6-4a generates only glial cells in abdominal segments. This is attributed to an asymmetric first division of NB6-4t, localizing prospero (pros) and glial cell missing (gcm) only to the glial precursor cell, and a symmetric division of NB6-4a, where both daughter cells express pros and gcm. Here we show that the NB6-4t lineage represents the ground state, which does not require the input of any homeotic gene, whereas the NB6-4a lineage is specified by the homeotic genes abd-A and Abd-B. They specify the NB6-4a lineage by down-regulating levels of the G1 cyclin, DmCycE (CycE). CycE, which is asymmetrically expressed after the first division of NB6-4t, functions upstream of pros and gcm to specify the neuronal sublineage. Loss of CycE function causes homeotic transformation of NB6-4t to NB6-4a, whereas ectopic CycE induces reverse transformations. However, other components of the cell cycle seem to have a minor role in this process, suggesting a critical role for CycE in regulating cell fate in segment-specific neural lineages.[1]

References

  1. A critical role for cyclin E in cell fate determination in the central nervous system of Drosophila melanogaster. Berger, C., Pallavi, S.K., Prasad, M., Shashidhara, L.S., Technau, G.M. Nat. Cell Biol. (2005) [Pubmed]
 
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