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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

The genes for the highly homologous Ca(2+)-binding proteins oncomodulin and parvalbumin are not linked in the human genome.

The chromosomal loci of the human parvalbumin and oncomodulin single-copy genes that encode structurally and evolutionarily closely related Ca(2+)-binding proteins were determined by somatic cell hybrid analysis. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA from 25 human-hamster somatic cell hybrids showed that the human gene for oncomodulin resides on chromosome 7. Analysis of human-mouse hybrids selectively retaining human chromosome 7 or a portion of it allowed specific assignment of the gene locus to the p11-p13 region of chromosome 7 known to be mutated or deleted in patients with the Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome. By gene dosage analysis on Southern blots, we showed that the gene for human parvalbumin maps distally to the cat eye syndrome marker D22S9 on chromosome 22q. Using somatic cell hybrids containing parts of human chromosome 22, the parvalbumin gene was sublocalized to the region 22q12-q13. 1. This region contains a linkage group that maps to mouse chromosome 15, region E, and includes the SIS, ARSA, and DIA 1 genes. Our findings are consistent with the recent localization of the mouse parvalbumin gene to this region by two independent methods (C. H. Zühlke et al., 1989, Genet. Res. 54:37-43; S. Adolph et al., 1989, Cytogenet. Cell Genet. 52:177-179).[1]

References

  1. The genes for the highly homologous Ca(2+)-binding proteins oncomodulin and parvalbumin are not linked in the human genome. Ritzler, J.M., Sawhney, R., Geurts van Kessel, A.H., Grzeschik, K.H., Schinzel, A., Berchtold, M.W. Genomics (1992) [Pubmed]
 
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