The world's first wiki where authorship really matters (Nature Genetics, 2008). Due credit and reputation for authors. Imagine a global collaborative knowledge base for original thoughts. Search thousands of articles and collaborate with scientists around the globe.

wikigene or wiki gene protein drug chemical gene disease author authorship tracking collaborative publishing evolutionary knowledge reputation system wiki2.0 global collaboration genes proteins drugs chemicals diseases compound
Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

The novel antidyskinetic drug sarizotan elicits different functional responses at human D2-like dopamine receptors.

Sarizotan (EMD 128130) is a chromane derivative that exhibits affinity at serotonin and dopamine receptors. Sarizotan effectively suppresses levodopa-induced dyskinesia in primate and rodent models of Parkinson's disease, and tardive dyskinesia in a rodent model. Results from clinical trials suggest that sarizotan significantly alleviates levodopa-induced dyskinesia. The functional effects of sarizotan on individual dopamine receptor subtypes are not known. Here we report the functional effects of sarizotan on human D2-like dopamine receptors (D2S, D2L, D3, D4.2 and D4.4) individually expressed in the AtT-20 neuroendocrine cell line. Using the coupling of D2-like dopamine receptors to G-protein coupled inward rectifier potassium channels we determined that sarizotan is a full agonist at D3 and D4.4 receptors (EC(50)=5.6 and 5.4nM, respectively) but a partial agonist at D2S, D2L and D4.2 receptors (EC(50)=29, 23 and 4.5nM, respectively). Consistent with its partial agonist property, sarizotan is an antagonist at D2S and D2L receptors (IC(50)=52 and 121nM, respectively). Using the coupling of D2-like dopamine receptors to adenylyl cyclase we determined that sarizotan is a full agonist at D2L, D3, D4.2 and D4.4 receptors (EC(50)=0.51, 0.47, 0.48 and 0.23nM, respectively) but a partial agonist at D2S receptors (EC(50)=0.6nM).[1]

References

 
WikiGenes - Universities