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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

Low-titer antibodies reactive with HTLV-I gag p19 in patients with chronic myeloneuropathy.

To elucidate the possible association of human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) and chronic neurological diseases, 156 serum samples from patients with various neurological diseases, including multiple sclerosis, chronic progressive myelopathy, chronic inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy, myasthenia gravis, polymyositis, motor neuron disease, and tension headache, and healthy control subjects were examined for IgG antibodies to HTLV-I by three independent techniques--gelatin particle agglutination test, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and Western blot assay. Specificity of antibodies was assessed by homologous competitive inhibition on Western blot assay. Six patients (3 with chronic progressive myelopathy, 1 with chronic inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy, 1 with motor neuron disease, and 1 with tension headache) had high-titer HTLV-I antibodies. Twelve patients (5 with multiple sclerosis, 1 with chronic progressive myelopathy, 2 with chronic inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy, 2 with myasthenia gravis, and 2 with motor neuron disease) had low-titer HTLV-I antibodies that reacted with a single gag protein, p19 or p24, on Western blot assay. In 4 (2 with multiple sclerosis, 1 with chronic progressive myelopathy, and 1 with chronic inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy) of these 12, the antibodies that were all directed to p19 were determined to be specific by homologous competitive inhibition. In the remaining 8 patients (3 with multiple sclerosis, 1 with chronic inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy, 2 with myasthenia gravis, and 2 with motor neuron disease), restricted reactions against p19 or p24 were considered to be nonspecific because they were not inhibited by homologous competitive inhibition. The results suggest that in some patients chronic myeloneuropathy diagnosed as chronic progressive multiple sclerosis, chronic progressive myelopathy, and chronic inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy may be associated with HTLV-I or related retroviruses.[1]

References

  1. Low-titer antibodies reactive with HTLV-I gag p19 in patients with chronic myeloneuropathy. Kawanishi, T., Akiguchi, I., Fujita, M., Kameyama, M., Hatanaka, M. Ann. Neurol. (1989) [Pubmed]
 
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