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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

Reactivity of potassium permanganate and tetraethylammonium chloride with mismatched bases and a simple mutation detection protocol.

Many mutation detection techniques rely upon recognition of mismatched base pairs in DNA hetero-duplexes. Potassium permanganate in combination with tetraethylammonium chloride (TEAC) is capable of chemically modifying mismatched thymidine residues. The DNA strand can then be cleaved at that point by treatment with piperidine. The reactivity of potassium permanganate (KMnO4) in TEAC toward mismatches was investigated in 29 different mutations, representing 58 mismatched base pairs and 116 mismatched bases. All mismatched thymidine residues were modified by KMnO4/TEAC with the majority of these showing strong reactivity. KMnO4/TEAC was also able to modify many mismatched guanosine and cytidine residues, as well as matched guanosine, cytidine and thymidine residues adjacent to, or nearby, mismatched base pairs. Previous techniques using osmium tetroxide (OsO4) to modify mismatched thymidine residues have been limited by the apparent lack of reactivity of a third of all T/G mismatches. KMnO4/TEAC showed no such phenomenon. In this series, all 29 mutations were detected by KMnO4/TEAC treatment. The latest development of the Single Tube Chemical Cleavage of Mismatch Method detects both thymidine and cytidine mismatches by KMnO4/TEAC and hydroxylamine (NH2OH) in a single tube without a clean-up step in between the two reactions. This technique saves time and material without disrupting the sensitivity and efficiency of either reaction.[1]

References

  1. Reactivity of potassium permanganate and tetraethylammonium chloride with mismatched bases and a simple mutation detection protocol. Lambrinakos, A., Humphrey, K.E., Babon, J.J., Ellis, T.P., Cotton, R.G. Nucleic Acids Res. (1999) [Pubmed]
 
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