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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

Structural genes adjacent to interspersed repetitive DNA sequences.

The observation that repetitive and single copy sequences are interspersed in animal DNAs has suggested that repetitive sequences are adjacent to single copy structural gene sequences. To test this concept, single copy DNA sequences contiguous to interspersed repetitive sequences were prepared from sea urchin DNA by hydroxyapatite fractionation (repeat-contiguous DNA fraction). These single copy sequences included about one third of the total nonrepetitive sequence in the genome as determined by the amounts recovered during the hydroxyapatite fractionation and by reassociation kinetics. 3H-labeled mRNA from sea urchin gastrula was prepared by puromycin release from polysomes and used in DNA-driven hybridization reactions. The kinetics of mRNA hybridization reactions with excess whole DNA were carefully measured, and the rate of hybridization was found to be 3-5 times slower than the corresponding single copy DNA driver reassociation rate. The mRNA hybridized with excess repeat-contiguous DNA with similar kinetics relative to the driver DNA. At completion 80 percent of that mRNA hybridizable with whole DNA (approximately 65 percent) had reacted with the repeat-contiguous DNA fraction (50 percent). This result shows that 80-100 percent of the mRNA molecules present in sea urchin embryos are transcribed from single copy DNA sequences adjacent to interspersed repetitive sequences in the genome.[1]

References

  1. Structural genes adjacent to interspersed repetitive DNA sequences. Davidson, E.H., Hough, B.R., Klein, W.H., Britten, R.J. Cell (1975) [Pubmed]
 
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