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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

Effect of ecabet sodium enema on mildly to moderately active ulcerative proctosigmoiditis: an open-label study.

OBJECTIVES: Ecabet sodium (ES), a nonabsorbable antigastric ulcer agent, has been shown to adhere to the region of an ulcer. It topically enhances gastric mucosal defensive factors such as the endogenous prostaglandins, capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves, nitric oxide, and mucin. All of these mucosal defensive factors play an important role in maintaining the mucosal integrity of the colon and rectum. Therefore, we investigated the effect of ES in patients with mildly to moderately active ulcerative proctosigmoiditis. METHODS: In an open-label study, seven patients with mildly to moderately active ulcerative colitis (UC) who had an inflamed mucosa in the rectum and/or sigmoid and were resistant to 4-wk topical and systemic standard treatment were treated with an ES enema b.i.d. for 14 days. The enema consisted of ES (1 g) and tepid water (20 or 50 ml). These patients were assessed by the Clinical Activity Index, colonoscopically, and histologically before and after the ES therapy. The ES therapy was started after obtaining informed consent from the patients. RESULTS: Six of the seven patients responded to therapy and achieved clinical, endoscopic, and histological remissions. One patient was withdrawn because of increased stool frequency. All six patients who completed the study showed a significant change in the mean Clinical Activity Index score from 5.3+/-1.4 (mean +/- SD) to 0.5+/-0.8 (p < 0.05), in the colonoscopic score from 3.0+/-0.9 to 0.8+/-0.4 (p < 0.05), and in the histological score from 2.7+/-0.5 to 0.5+/-0.6 (p < 0.05), and achieved remission at the end of the study. There were no side effects attributable to the ES therapy. Five of the six patients are still in clinical remission after a median follow-up period of 5 months. CONCLUSIONS: The ES enemas proved to be a safe and potentially useful adjuvant therapy currently available for treating patients with mildly to moderately active ulcerative proctosigmoiditis. A controlled study is necessary to confirm our results.[1]

References

  1. Effect of ecabet sodium enema on mildly to moderately active ulcerative proctosigmoiditis: an open-label study. Kono, T., Nomura, M., Kasai, S., Kohgo, Y. Am. J. Gastroenterol. (2001) [Pubmed]
 
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