The world's first wiki where authorship really matters (Nature Genetics, 2008). Due credit and reputation for authors. Imagine a global collaborative knowledge base for original thoughts. Search thousands of articles and collaborate with scientists around the globe.

wikigene or wiki gene protein drug chemical gene disease author authorship tracking collaborative publishing evolutionary knowledge reputation system wiki2.0 global collaboration genes proteins drugs chemicals diseases compound
Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

Carboxypeptidase Z ( CPZ) modulates Wnt signaling and regulates the development of skeletal elements in the chicken.

Carboxypeptidase Z ( CPZ) is a secreted Zn-dependent enzyme whose biological function is largely unknown. CPZ has a bipartite structure consisting of an N-terminal cysteine-rich domain (CRD) and a C-terminal catalytic domain. In the early chicken embryo CPZ is initially expressed throughout the somites and subsequently becomes restricted to the sclerotome. To initiate a functional analysis of CPZ, a CPZ producing retroviral vector was applied to the presomitic mesoderm at the level of the future wing. This resulted in a loss of the scapular blade and of rostral ribs. Such dysmorphogenesis is preceded by ectopic Pax3 expression in the hypaxial part of the dermomyotome, a region from which the blade of the scapula normally derives. A mutant CPZ, lacking a critical active site glutamate, fails to induce Pax3 expression and does not cause skeletal defects. The induction of Pax3, a Wnt-responsive gene in somites, and the presence of a CRD prompted us to examine whether CPZ affects Wnt signaling. In an in vitro assay we found that CPZ, but not its inactive mutant form, enhances the Wnt-dependent induction of the homeobox gene Cdx1. In addition, immunoprecipitation experiments suggest that the CRD of CPZ acts as a binding domain for Wnt. Taken together these data provide the first evidence for CPZ playing a role in Wnt signaling.[1]

References

 
WikiGenes - Universities