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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 
 
 

Ertapenem: a review of its use in the treatment of bacterial infections.

The Group 1, 1 beta-methyl carbapenem ertapenem (Invanz) is approved for parenteral use in patients with complicated intra-abdominal infection (cIAI), community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and acute pelvic infection caused by susceptible strains of certain designated organisms in both the US and the EU. Additional approved indications in the US include complicated skin and skin structure infection (cSSSI) and complicated urinary tract infection (cUTI). Ertapenem is approved for use in adults in both the US and the EU and in paediatric patients aged >or=3 months in the US.Ertapenem has a broad spectrum of in vitro activity against Gram-negative pathogens, including extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)- and AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae, Gram-positive pathogens and anaerobic pathogens. It has similar efficacy to comparator antibacterials such as piperacillin/tazobactam in cSSSI (including diabetic foot infection), cIAI and acute pelvic infection and ceftriaxone with or without metronidazole in cIAI, cUTI and CAP. The drug has also shown efficacy in the treatment of paediatric patients with complicated community-acquired bacterial infections. Ertapenem has a convenient once-daily administration schedule and is generally well tolerated. Thus, ertapenem is an important option for the empirical treatment of complicated community-acquired bacterial infections in hospitalised patients.[1]

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