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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

Expression of herpes simplex virus beta and gamma genes integrated in mammalian cells and their induction by an alpha gene product.

The proteins of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) form three kinetic groups termed alpha, beta, and gamma, whose synthesis is regulated in a cascade fashion. alpha products are synthesized first during infection, and they are required for synthesis of beta and gamma proteins. To examine the expression of several HSV-1 beta and gamma genes in the absence of alpha functions, we transferred into mammalian cells a plasmid containing a region of the HSV-1 genome that codes for only beta and gamma genes (0.315 to 0.421 map units). We found stable integration of at least one copy of the intact plasmid in each cell line. Four HSV-1 transcripts of the beta and gamma classes were transcribed constitutively in the cells, including the genes for glycoprotein B and DNA-binding protein. No constitutive synthesis of these two proteins could be demonstrated, however. The integrated HSV-1 genes responded to viral regulatory signals in that they could be induced by infection with HSV-1 mutants resulting in a high level of synthesis of both glycoprotein B and DNA-binding protein. The HSV-1 alpha gene product ICP4 was necessary for this induction, and it was found to be most efficient at a low multiplicity of infection. Functional expression of four genes was demonstrated in that the cell lines complemented infecting HSV-1 temperature-sensitive mutants. The same genes were not available for homologous recombination with infecting virus, however, since no recombinant wild-type virus could be detected. These data demonstrate that HSV-1 beta and gamma genes can be transcribed in the absence of alpha functions in mammalian cells, but that they still respond to HSV-1 regulatory signals such as the alpha gene product ICP4.[1]

References

  1. Expression of herpes simplex virus beta and gamma genes integrated in mammalian cells and their induction by an alpha gene product. Sandri-Goldin, R.M., Goldin, A.L., Holland, L.E., Glorioso, J.C., Levine, M. Mol. Cell. Biol. (1983) [Pubmed]
 
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