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Hoffmann, R. A wiki for the life sciences where authorship matters. Nature Genetics (2008)
 
 
 

Absence seizures decrease steroid modulation of t-[35S]butylbicyclophosphorothionate binding in thalamic relay nuclei.

Interaction of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), pentobarbital and two neuroactive steroids on t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate ([35S]TBPS) binding to GABAA receptors in thalamus was studied during absence seizures. In control brain sections, the steroids alphaxalone and tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (at low 0.1-1 microM concentrations) increased [35S]TBPS binding in thalamic relay nuclei. Both GABA and pentobarbital dose-dependently decreased [35S]TBPS binding in these nuclei. A significant decrease in the ability of steroids to increase [35S]TBPS binding in thalamic relay nuclei was observed during absence seizures induced by gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB). This loss of steroid effect on binding was 1) selective to steroids only as GABA and pentobarbital modulation of [35S]TBPS binding in these nuclei did not change significantly and 2) not causally related to the generation of GHB-induced absence seizures as it was not observed at the onset of GHB-seizures but developed 30 min after the seizure-onset. We tested whether absence seizures were critical for the development of this loss of steroid effect on [35S]TBPS binding in thalamic relay nuclei. The ability of the steroids to increase [35S]TBPS binding in relay nuclei was preserved when GHB-seizures were blocked. When the duration of GHB-seizures was prolonged, the loss of steroid effect on [35S]TBPS binding in thalamus persisted throughout the seizure-duration. These findings suggest that absence seizures cause a rapid loss of steroid effect on [35S]TBPS binding to GABAA receptors in thalamic relay nuclei.[1]

References

  1. Absence seizures decrease steroid modulation of t-[35S]butylbicyclophosphorothionate binding in thalamic relay nuclei. Banerjee, P.K., Olsen, R.W., Tillakaratne, N.J., Brailowsky, S., Tobin, A.J., Snead, O.C. J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. (1998) [Pubmed]
 
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